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TITAN CREATES 'PSYCHOPATH'
CAREMENTER ON PIC, VIDGAME RAMPAGE

 
By BEN FRITZ

John Carpenter is taking his next project to game consoles and the bigscreen simultaneously.

As the E3 vidgame confab opens in Los Angeles today, the horror director is teaming with Titan Productions on "Psychopath," a new project to be developed concurrently as a videogame and film. Carpenter will oversee the game and direct its produced scenes and is attached to helm and co-write the film, along with Todd Farmer ("Jason X").

"Psychopath" is about an ex-CIA operative called back into action to stop a serial killer who begins to question his own sanity.

The company has already hired a game developer and is talking to publishers at E3 this week about distributing the game, after which it plans to approach studios about a film.

Woo exits games

Titan is a new vidgame and film production company headed by Brad Foxhoven, who previously ran John Woo's videogame company Tiger Hill. Woo is exiting vidgames to focus on his slate of upcoming films, leaving Foxhoven to start his new company along with former Tiger Hill creative director David Wohl.

The pair are taking several Tiger Hill projects with them to their new company, including "Shadow Clan," about a descendant of ninjas drawn into a modern-day battle. With Woo bowing out, Titan is now looking to attach a new director and talent to the game, which Foxhoven also hopes to turn into a film.

Titan is also working on an untitled project for Sony's PSP with vidgame developer Anna Kang. Id Software, the company behind mega-franchise "Doom," may also be involved on the project.

In addition, Titan will work with Tiger Hill on its last two projects before that company winds down: "Demonik," with horror author Clive Barker, and an untitled project set up at publisher Midway.

Titan a middleman
Titan is one of a small number of production companies, along with Vin Diesel's Tigon Studios, looking to connect Hollywood to the vidgame world. In addition to creating original properties for both the videogame and film worlds, Foxhoven is hoping to work with studios and other producers as they move into interactive media.

"We have had discussions with studios about helping to facilitate games from their library and development list," he said. "Hollywood has a ton of great projects stuck in development hell that would make great games."

More than 50,000 vidgame professionals are descending on Los Angeles this week for E3, where publishers, developers and consolemakers shop their hottest wares for the next year. Already, industry giants Sony, Nintendo and Microsoft have previewed to media pros and attendees the next generation consoles that will debut in the next year.

New generation of games
Sony and Microsoft are both coming out with higher-powered -- and likely high-priced -- machines that they hope to make the center of a digitally connected home. In addition to offering high-definition, near cinematic quality graphics, consoles will store and play digital music and photos, connect to the Internet for online gaming and play music and movies stored on computer and other devices. Microsoft's Xbox 360 will come out this fall, while Sony is releasing its more advanced PlayStation 3 next spring.

Nintendo, meanwhile, is continuing its focus on a broader gaming market. Its Revolution, which comes out next year, won't be as powerful as its competitors but will likely be less expensive and target more casual gamers with the ability to download and play popular games from previous consoles.

Japanese company is also looking to continue its dominance in handheld games against growing competition from Sony's PSP. Nintendo is adding wireless online gaming capabilities to its DS handheld device and releasing a new Gameboy Micro that's small enough to fit in a pocket.

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